bullit1987:

New York, 1917. The American soprano Marcia Van Dresser, who participated in War Bond and patriotic programs at the Metropolitan Opera

bullit1987:

New York, 1917. The American soprano Marcia Van Dresser, who participated in War Bond and patriotic programs at the Metropolitan Opera

artsavestheday:


Black Light Series #10: Flag for the Moon: Die Nigger - Faith Ringgold
1969. 
Oil on canvas,
ACA Galleries, New York, NY.
    Jasper Johns’ Flag continued to be a source of inspiration for other artists, and its influence can be directly seen in Faith Ringgold’s painting, Flag for the Moon: Die Nigger, 1969. The mood of the piece, made at the end of the Civil Rights Movement, is in direct contrast to Johns’ Flag. It is politically charged and incredibly explicit, opposing the ambivalence and ambiguity present in Johns’ work. Here the critique of America is unavoidable, and the goal of the piece is more than to just generate thought in the viewer. 
      The message is meant to be both vulgar and confrontational. When asked why she inscribed the words “die” behind the stars and “nigger” behind the stripes Ringgold responded, “It would be impossible for me to picture the American flag just as a flag, as if that is the whole story. I need to communicate my relationship with this flag based on my experience as a black woman in America.” Thus for Ringgold, the American flag could never be looked upon with ambivalence. The violence and racism imposed on her life was unavoidable and she communicated this message explicitly to her viewers. 


 

artsavestheday:

Black Light Series #10: Flag for the Moon: Die Nigger - Faith Ringgold

1969.

Oil on canvas,

ACA Galleries, New York, NY.

    Jasper Johns’ Flag continued to be a source of inspiration for other artists, and its influence can be directly seen in Faith Ringgold’s painting, Flag for the Moon: Die Nigger, 1969The mood of the piece, made at the end of the Civil Rights Movement, is in direct contrast to Johns’ Flag. It is politically charged and incredibly explicit, opposing the ambivalence and ambiguity present in Johns’ work. Here the critique of America is unavoidable, and the goal of the piece is more than to just generate thought in the viewer.

      The message is meant to be both vulgar and confrontational. When asked why she inscribed the words “die” behind the stars and “nigger” behind the stripes Ringgold responded, “It would be impossible for me to picture the American flag just as a flag, as if that is the whole story. I need to communicate my relationship with this flag based on my experience as a black woman in America. Thus for Ringgold, the American flag could never be looked upon with ambivalence. The violence and racism imposed on her life was unavoidable and she communicated this message explicitly to her viewers.